Writing a sentence with commas rules

One way they explain their ideas is to include examples which make the writer's thoughts much more concrete, practical, and comprehensible to the reader. Without good examples, the reader is left with just theories that are too difficult to use and apply. Look at the following paragraph:

Writing a sentence with commas rules

Not recommended for 28 or 56k phone-line connections. If your computer is equipped with PowerPoint, click on the PowerPoint icon to the right for a brief PowerPoint presentation on comma usage.

Use a comma to separate the elements in a series three or more thingsincluding the last two. Using a comma between all the items in a series, including the last two, avoids this problem. In newspaper writing, incidentally, writing a sentence with commas rules will seldom find a serial comma, but that is not necessarily a sign that it should be omitted in academic prose.

If there is ever any doubt, however, use the comma, as it is always correct in this situation. One of the most frequent errors in comma usage is the placement of a comma after a coordinating conjunction.

We cannot say that the comma will always come before the conjunction and never after, but it would be a rare event, indeed, that we need to follow a coordinating conjunction with a comma.

When speaking, we do sometimes pause after the little conjunction, but there is seldom a good reason to put a comma there. For additional information on coordinating conjunctions, click HERE. See the note BELOW regarding the use of a comma between two independent clauses when the second independent clause begins with a parenthetical element or adverbial clause.

Use a comma to set off introductory elements, as in "Running toward third base, he suddenly realized how stupid he looked. If there is ever any doubt, use the comma, as it is always correct. If you would like some additional guidelines on using a comma after introductory elements, click HERE.

Use a comma to set off parenthetical elements, as in "The Founders Bridge, which spans the Connecticut River, is falling down. The parenthetical element is sometimes called "added information.

Appositives are almost always treated as parenthetical elements. Eleanor, his wife of thirty years, suddenly decided to open her own business.

Sometimes the appositive and the word it identifies are so closely related that the comma can be omitted, as in "His wife Eleanor suddenly decided to open her own business.

But "his wife" and "Eleanor" are so close that we can regard the entire phrase as one unit and leave out the commas. With the phrase turned around, however, we have a more definite parenthetical element and the commas are necessary: As pointed out above Rule 3an adverbial clause that begins a sentence is set off with a comma: Although Queasybreath had spent several years in Antarctica, he still bundled up warmly in the brisk autumns of Ohio.

Because Tashonda had learned to study by herself, she was able to pass the entrance exam. When an adverbial clause comes later on in the sentence, however, the writer must determine if the clause is essential to the meaning of the sentence or not.

A "because clause" can be particularly troublesome in this regard. In most sentences, a "because clause" is essential to the meaning of the sentence, and it will not be set off with a comma: The Okies had to leave their farms in the midwest because the drought conditions had ruined their farms.

Sometimes, though, the "because clause" must be set off with a comma to avoid misreading: I knew that President Nixon would resign that morning, because my sister-in-law worked in the White House and she called me with the news. Nixon did not resign because my sister-in-law worked in the White House, so we set off that clause to make the meaning clearly parenthetical.

The Red Sox were leading the league at the end of May, but of course, they always do well in the spring. We visited Hartford, Connecticut, last summer.

writing a sentence with commas rules

Paris, France, is sometimes called "The City of Lights. Heublein, a Hartford, Connecticut-based company, is moving to another state.

Common sentence construction problems

An absolute phrase is always treated as a parenthetical element, as is an interjection.Professor Sterbenz. Business Insider/Mamta Badkar Contrary to popular belief, commas don't just signify pauses in a sentence..

In fact, precise rules govern when to use this punctuation mark. Rule 1. Use commas to separate words and word groups in a simple series of three or more items. Example: My estate goes to my husband, son, daughter-in-law, and nephew.

Note: When the last comma in a series comes before and or or (after daughter-in-law in the above example), it is known as the Oxford schwenkreis.com newspapers and magazines drop the Oxford comma in a simple series, apparently.

Welcome to St. Cloud State University and LEO: Literacy Education Online. LEO provides online handouts about a variety of writing topics. Although LEO is affiliated with the Write Place (the writing center at St.

Cloud State University), LEO does not offer online tutoring, answer questions about grammar or punctuation, or give feedback about your writing or papers. 7 Rules for Commas 1. Comma after “yes” or “no” at the beginning of a sentence. Example: Yes, I would like to have a carrot. Example: No, I didn’t see you at the soccer game.

2. Comma before or after direct address (speaking to someone using their name). Example. 7 Rules for Commas 1. Comma after “yes” or “no” at the beginning of a sentence.

Example: Yes, I would like to have a carrot. Example: No, I didn’t see you at the soccer game. 2. Comma before or after direct address (speaking to someone using their name). Example. Think that you know commas? You may be surprised. Even the most experienced writers have problems remembering all the rules.

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Reference List: Basic Rules // Purdue Writing Lab